Schedule


Schedule-at-a-glance

Following is a preliminary conference schedule and is subject to change. Please check back for the most up-to-date schedule and information. 

  

WEDNESDAY, March 16

12:00pm - 5:00pm

Housing & Community Development Pre-conference Workshop

 

THURSDAY, March 17

9:00am - 12:30pm  
Housing & Community Development Pre-conference Workshop
Design-Build Pre-conference Workshop
2:00pm - 3:30pm
  
PS: Acting Out: The Politics and Practices of Interventions 1

PS: Architecture is Philosophy: Beyond the Post-Critical 1

PS: Urban Knowledge in Architectural Education 1

PS: Challenging Materiality: Industry Collaborations Reshaping Design - Open

PrS: Architecture in an Expanded Field, from Interiors to Landscapes 1



DPACSA Annual Meeting

SFS: Is IPAL Your School’s Pal?
4:00pm - 5:30pm   PS: Acting Out: The Politics and Practices of Interventions 2
PS: Open
PS: Urban Knowledge in Architectural Education 2

PrS: Open
PrS: Architecture in an Expanded Field, from Interiors to Landscapes 2


AS: Creative Achievement Award


AS: Distinguished Professor Award
SFS: APR Preparation for 2017 NAAB Visits

6:00pm
 
Toshiko Mori 
Tau Sigma Delta Gold Medal, Opening Keynote 


Opening Reception, Sponsored by LMN Architects, 2016 AIA Firm Award  

  

FRIDAY, March 18

8:00am - 9:30am   
Tau Sigma Delta (TSD) BREAKFAST & TSD Annual Meeting
9:00am - 10:30am
   Regional Caucuses
11:00am - 12:30pm   PS: Divergent Modes of Engagement: Exploring the Spectrum of Collaborative and Participatory Practices 1
PS: Standard Deviation 1

PS: Knowledge in the Public Interest


PS: Knowledge Fields: Between Architecture and Landscape 1


PrS: Urbanism, History and Theory

AS: Collaborative Practice Award

SFS:  Technology Architecture + Design (BTES)


SFS: Value of Design| Academy Engagement (AIA)


12:30pm - 2:30pm    ACSA Business Meeting & Lunch
2:30pm - 4:00pm    PS:  Divergent Modes of Engagement: Exploring the Spectrum of Collaborative and Participatory Practices 2
PS:  Standard Deviation 2

PS:  Structure as Design Knowledge

PS:  Knowledge Fields: Between Architecture and Landscape 2
PrS: Design Research & Building Behaviors 1 AS: New Faculty Teaching Award


SFS:  Beginning Design (NCBDS)


SFS: How to Succeed at Research by Really Trying


4:30pm - 6:00pm    PS: Making It: Labor, Participatory Architecture, and the Politics of the Algorithm
PS: Probing Technique: Building Research in Architecture’s Modernity


PS: The Architecture of History


PS: International Design/Build: Community Service or Architectural Imperialism


PrS: Design Research & Building Behaviors 2


AS: Diversity Achievement Award


SFS: Partnerships in Health & Resilience


SFS: The How of Research Domains Workshop


6:30pm

Distinguished Professor Awards & Topaz Laureate Keynote


Awards Reception

  

SATURDAY, March 19

9:00am - 10:30am    PS: Beginnings in the Context of New Knowledge
PS: Water, Water Everywhere… 1
PS: Hoarding, Updating, Drafting: The Production of Knowledge in Architectural History - Open

PrS: Materials and Media Investigations 1

AS: Practice and Leasdership Award


AS: Design Build Award


SFS: Partnerships with Community Colleges


 
11:00am - 12:30pm
PS: Giving up Control: Finding New Agency in the Era of Interdisciplinary Practice
PS: Water, Water Everywhere… 2


PS: Intelligent Architectural Settings: Tools for Societal and Programmatic Performance Analytics


PrS: Materials and Media Investigations 2


AS: Housing Design Education Award


AS: Faculty Design Award


SFS: Positions on Smart Environments

SFS: Leveraging Student Leadership (AIAS)
12:30pm  - 2:00pm
  Open
 
2:00pm - 3:30pm


SFS: Mass Timber: Design, Fabrication, Education
SFS: High Performance Design

SFS: Women’s Leadership Council / The Missing 32%



Self-guided Tours

Bellevue Art Museum
4:30pm   Closing Plenary @ University of Washington


 University of Washington Closing Reception
 
  PS = Paper Session | PrS = Project Session | AS = Award Session | SFS = Special Focus Session
 
 

Full-Schedule

Following is the conference schedule and is subject to change. All attendees will receive a printed program at registration in Seattle.

 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2016                                                                                                                     

10:00 AM - 06:00 PM       Registration                                                                                           

12:00 PM - 06:00 PM       ACSA / AIA Housing and Community Development Pre-conference Workshop
Avenues of Exchange: Tools for Shaping Stronger Conversations among Professionals, Researchers & Communities

Join members of the ACSA and AIA for an interactive workshop that will explore opportunities to increase the exchange of information and ideas between academics, communities, and practitioners to advance the teaching and practice of housing and community development. The goal of the workshop for presenters and participants to share and analyze successful examples of projects, programs, and resources, while opening the conversation up to new collaborations. The event will take place over two days with a half-day workshop on March 16th and a half-day local project tour on March 17th to look at of models of best practices in housing and community development. Earn up to 7 CEUs with the opportunity for HSW credit. 
 
 
 THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 2016                                                                                                                        


8:30 AM - 06:00 PM
      Registration 

09:00 AM - 2:00 PM      Design Build Workshop
ACSA / DBX Network: Collaborative Workshop

Join members of ACSA and DBX (Design Build Exchange) Network for a half-day workshop on design building programs. The DESIGN BUILD EXCHANGE (dbX) is an initiative to facilitate the exchange of information, knowledge, and practices critical to educational design build. It advocates for design build and aims to define the full breadth of its possibilities. It will establish a network, archive resources, host live resources, and design a peer review system appropriate to the field. The initiative was supported in principle at the ACSA 102nd Annual Meeting in Miami and developed in a workshop at the ACSA Design Build Fall-Conference in Halifax. At last years 103rd Annual Meeting, the ACSA agreed to add resources to the initiative. The dbX collaborates with dbX Europe and Live Projects (U.K.) and is funded by grants from the SSHRC Canada and ComputeCanada.This session develops the direction and content for next stage of the dbX.

09:00 AM - 12:00 PM      ACSA / AIA Housing and Community Development Pre-conference Workshop
Walking tour of local housing and community development projects in Seattle.
People with mobility issues are asked to please contact the ACSA staff in advance.



02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
      Acting Out: The Politics and Practices of Interventions: Session 1
Paper Session
Moderator: Mireille Roddier, University of Michigan & Anca Trandafirescu, University of Michigan
In this session, we are looking for papers and projects that theoretically expand and exemplify this “parasidic mode of urbanization,” in regard to their role within and outside of legal structures, their claimed ideological stances, and their disciplinary positioning. We are interested in both projects and papers that recognize in this realm the potential to recoup the political agency of a new architectural autonomy (Ole Bauman’s “Unsolicited Architecture”), as well as those framed as “design actions for the common good,” initiated and funded by architects operating as the new social workers serving an abstracted and disenfranchised “public.”

Architecture as a Verb/Design as Cultural Practice
                       
B.D. Wortham-Galvin, Portland State University

Hold, Denote or Reserve: Spatial strategies in Detroit´s available space
                        Ana Morcillo Pallares, University of Michigan

The Act(ivat)or’s Toolbox: Expanded Roles, Actions, and Parameters in the Production of the Urban Commons
                        Antje K. Steinmuller, California College of the Arts

02:00 PM - 03:30 PM      Architecture is Philosophy: Beyond the Post-Critical: Session 1                 Paper Session
Moderator: Mark Thorsby, Lone Star College
& Thomas Forget, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
To apply philosophical constructs to architecture is to overlook that philosophy and architecture are parallel, as opposed to intersecting, disciplines. This panel strives to uncover design methods and theories with consequences that transcend form and style, exploring an inherent reciprocity between philosophy and architecture, as well as the potential of that reciprocity to build and shape new ways of knowing architecture. The context of this aspiration is the ongoing post-critical debate in the architectural discipline.

Disciplinary Promiscuity and its Discontents
                        Eva Perez de Vega, Parsons The New School for Design

Objects Unknown Against Buildings Well-Known: Notes on a Pedestrian Knowledge of Architecture
                        Philip Schauss, The New School for Social Research

Locating Architectural Production
                        Phillip Anzalone, New York City College of Technology

                        Stephanie Bayard, Pratt Institute Graduate School of Architecture

Revisiting Assemblage: A Search for the Force of Architectural Thinking
                        Randall Teal, University of Idaho

02:00 PM - 03:30 PM      Architecture in an Expanded Field, from Interiors to Landscapes ONE         Project Session
Moderator:         Mari Fujita, University of British Columbia
Scholarship and design-based investigations situated at the architectural scale often slip toward the space of the room or the expanse of the site.  Indeed some of the most often studied projects of recent years operate within this larger field of space making.  This topic seeks to provide a home for work beyond the precise scale of the building.

Arrivals Public Art + Infrastructure Project
                        Caryn Brause, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

                        Joseph Krupczynski, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Breaking Ground
                        Marc A. Roehrle

bridging between interior experience and environmental stewardship
                        Daniel Butko, University of Oklahoma

Civil War Veterans Memoria
                        A. Katherine Bambrick Ambroziak, University of Tennessee-Knoxville

Flying Carpet
                        Glenn Wilcox, University of Michigan

                        Anca Trandafirescu, University of Michigan

Latent (e)Scapes
                        Lee Su Huang, University of Florida

                        Gregory Spaw, American University of Sharjah

                        Christina Geros, Harvard University

                        Jake Marsico, Carnegie Mellon University

02:00 PM - 03:30 PM      ACSA College of Distinguished Professors (DPACSA) Annual Meeting
Private Meetings
Chancellor:         Frances Bronet, Illinois Institute of Technology

02:00 PM - 03:30 PM      Open: Challenging Materiality: Industry Collaborations Reshaping Design
Paper Session
Moderator: Julie Larsen, Syracuse University & Roger Hubeli, Syracuse University
This session argues that, once again, the combination of design technology with the advancement in material science offers productive opportunities for designers. With architectural projects, installations, or exhibitions as a case study to reflect on broader collaborations, this session will explore the following questions: How can the contemporary digital practice be influenced by specific material properties and industrial processes? How can collaborations between architects, engineers and manufacturing influence our thinking before the design process even starts? In the spirit of Hennebique, are there new alternative projects or means to achieve undiscovered design potential? Where can technical challenges lead to projective projects that provoke new meaning in materials and fabrication?

Investigating Perceptions of the Architects’ Role in Integrated Practices
                        Hamid Abdirad, University of Washington

                        Christopher Monson, University of Washington

Paradoxical Territories between Traditional and Digital Crafts in Japanese Joinery
                        Ahmed K. Ali, Texas A&M University

PCM, collaborations with BASF
                        Georg Rafailidis, University At Buffalo, SUNY

Pricing the Factory-Built House
                        Alex T. Anderson, University of Washington

02:00 PM - 03:30 PM      Urban Knowledge in Architectural Education: Session 1                            Paper Session
Moderator: Jeffrey Hou, University of Washington & Joseph Heathcott, Parsons The New School for Design
What should we know about the city in order to design for it? To what aspects and conditions of urbanism should architecture respond? What forms and contents of urban knowledge are most relevant for design practice? This panel seeks ground for a knowledge and understanding of the city relevant for architectural education. We begin from the point of view that "the urban" is constituted through multiple fields, including spatial-territorial organization, overlapping scales and temporalities, and ideological and perceptual frameworks..

Cross Media Imaging of Latin American Informal Cities
                        Carie Penabad, University of Miami

                        Adib Cure, University of Miami

Knowing What We Don't Know
                        Jeffrey Nesbit, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Neighborhood Archeology: Site Analysis as a Design Tool for Urban Public Housing
                        Choon Choi, Seoul National University

Towards a Queer Urban Design Methodology
                        B.D. Wortham-Galvin, Portland State University

02:00 PM - 03:30 PM      Is IPAL Your School’s Pal? (NCARB)
Special Focus Session

Facilitator: Harry M. Falconer, Jr. National Council of Architectural Registration Boards

Is your school considering developing an option integrating the components of licensure into your program accredited by the NAAB?  Is your school one of the inaugural class participating in the NCARB-accepted Integrated Path to Architectural (IPAL) initiative? Are you curious about what it means to be NCARB-accepted? Or are you just curious?  If yes to any of the above - then you should participate in this forum.  Bring your thoughts, questions, concerns, understandings, misunderstandings, pessimism, and optimism and share in this conversation.  This is your opportunity to have uncensored dialogue with real people participating in the Integrated Path initiative and real people from NCARB.

 

03:30 PM - 04:00 PM      Coffee Break 

04:00 PM - 05:30 PM      Acting Out: The Politics and Practices of Interventions: Session 2
Paper Session
Moderator:          Mireille Roddier, University of Michigan
& Anca Trandafirescu, University of Michigan
In this session, we are looking for papers and projects that theoretically expand and exemplify this “parasidic mode of urbanization,” in regard to their role within and outside of legal structures, their claimed ideological stances, and their disciplinary positioning. We are interested in both projects and papers that recognize in this realm the potential to recoup the political agency of a new architectural autonomy (Ole Bauman’s “Unsolicited Architecture”), as well as those framed as “design actions for the common good,” initiated and funded by architects operating as the new social workers serving an abstracted and disenfranchised “public.”

Draw In / Draw Out: Participatory Experience Maps as Event Urbanism
                        Joshua M. Nason, University of Texas at Arlington

HACKING UBAN SPACE, The Agency of the Open Source City
                        Gernot Riether, Kennesaw State University

Pop-Up Urbanism and the Right to the City:
                        Anthony W. Schuman, New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Spaces and Ideology: Public Art and a New Urban Movement in Iran
                        Seyedeh Ladan Zarabadi, University of Cincinnati

04:00 PM - 5:30 PM        Open - Materials and Methods
Paper Session
Moderator: TBD

            Hydraulic Modeling as Craft: A Material Practice for Design                       

                        Justine Holzman, University of Tennessee-Knoxville

            Capricious Concrete: On Plasticity in Material and Method
                        Charles Phinney, Virginia Tech

04:00 PM - 05:30 PM      Architecture in an Expanded Field, from Interiors to Landscapes TWO
Project Session
Moderator: Mo Zell, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Scholarship and design-based investigations situated at the architectural scale often slip toward the space of the room or the expanse of the site.  Indeed some of the most often studied projects of recent years operate within this larger field of space making.  This topic seeks to provide a home for work beyond the precise scale of the building.

Mobile Craft Module
                        Adam Marcus, California College of the Arts

PRODUCTION PROCESS: DEVELOPING LOGICS OF SURFACE, OBJECT, SPACE, AND EFFECTS
                        Clay Odom, University of Texas at Austin

The Continental Compact
                        Ian Caine, University of Texas At San Antonio

                        Derek Hoeferlin, Washington University in St. Louis

                        Emily Chen

                        Tiffin Thompson

                        Pablo Chavez

Ver Sacrum
                        Daniel M. Baerlecken, Georgia Institute of Technology

                        Sabri Gokmen, Georgia Institute of Technology

                        Judith Reitz, DESIGNDEVELOPBUILD
 


Zhangdu Lake Farm
                        Richard Garber, New Jersey Institute of Technology

 

04:00 PM - 05:30 PM      Creative Achievement Award
Award Session
Moderator: Stephen Phillips, California Polytechnic State University

Creative Achievement Award recognizes specific achievement in teaching, design, scholarship, research, or service that advances architectural education.

Unearthing Traces of Rhode Island's Slavery and Slave Trade
                        Julian Bonder, Roger Williams University

Emmanouil Vermisso, Florida Atlantic University 

Troy Schaum, Rice University

04:00 PM - 05:30 PM      Distinguished Professor Award
Award Session
Moderator: Frances Bronet, Illinois Institute of Technology
Distinguished Professor Award recognizes sustained creative achievement in the advancement of architectural education through teaching, design, scholarship, research, or service.

Daniel S. Friedman, University of Hawaii At Manoa 

Francisco J. Rodriguez-Suarez, Universidad De Puerto Rico

04:00 PM - 5:30 PM      Open
Project Session
Moderator:    Sharon Haar, University of Michigan
Architecture and architecture education research projects.

30 x 30: Celebrating the first 30 years of the International Archive of Women in Architecture
                        Paola Zellner-Bassett, Virginia Tech

Centennial Chromagraph
                        Adam Marcus, California College of the Arts

Citadel Beacon
                        James C. Forren, Dalhousie University

Hyper-Media Wall
                        Matthew Gines, University of New Mexico

                        Tim Castillo, University of New Mexico

Integration at Its Finest: Case Study of 3 Federal High Performing Buildings
                        Renee Cheng, University of Minnesota

                        Carrie Dossick, University of Washington

Interactive Form-Making Installation
                        Saleh Kalantari, Washington State University

04:00 PM - 05:30 PM      Urban Knowledge in Architectural Education: Session 2
Paper Session
Moderator: Jeffrey Hou, University of Washington
& Joseph Heathcott, Parsons The New School for Design
What should we know about the city in order to design for it? To what aspects and conditions of urbanism should architecture respond? What forms and contents of urban knowledge are most relevant for design practice? This panel seeks ground for a knowledge and understanding of the city relevant for architectural education. We begin from the point of view that "the urban" is constituted through multiple fields, including spatial-territorial organization, overlapping scales and temporalities, and ideological and perceptual frameworks.

Beyond Inert Sites-Scoping the Urban Landscape_ Re-calibrating Architectural Narratives and Practices Through the Shaping of New Urban Knowledge in Architectural Education
                        Shannon Bassett, University At Buffalo, SUNY

Projecting Urban Villages in Shenzhen
                        Mari Fujita, University of British Columbia

Social Interaction and Cohesion Tool: Integrating Socio-Computational Design in Urban Ecology for Barcelona’s Superilles
                        Philip Speranza, University of Oregon

There and Elsewhere: Architecture and the Political Ecological City
                        Brent Sturlaugson, University of Kentucky
 

04:00 PM - 05:30 PM      APR Preparation for 2017 NAAB Visits
Special Focus Session

Panelists: Cassandra Pair, National Architectural Accrediting Board

This workshop is for anyone responsible for writing an Architecture Program Report for a 2017 NAAB visit. During the session, the NAAB will

●       Introduce the 2014 Conditions for Accreditation
●       Introduce the APR template and other tools

●       Review the instructions for preparing APRs

●       Review best practices for writing APRs

05:30 PM - 06:00 PM      Coffee Break

06:00 PM - 07:30 PM     Opening Keynote Toshiko Mori 
                                          2016 Tau Sigma Delta Gold Medal

07:30 PM - 08:30 PM      Opening Reception
                                        Sponsored by
LMN Architects, 2016 AIA Firm Award
 

08:30 PM - 10:00 PM      College of ACSA Distinguished Professors (DPACSA) Event
Private                                                                                                                         

 FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 2016                                                                                                                               

8:00 AM - 06:30 PM      Registration          

09:00 AM - 06:30 PM      Exhibit Hall                                                                    

8:00 AM - 09:30 AM      Breakfast
                                      
Sponsored by Tau Sigma Delta National Honor Society

8:00 AM - 09:00 AM      Tau Sigma Delta, National Honor Society Annual Meeting
Moderator: Thomas Fowler IV, California Polytechnic State University 

09:00 AM - 10:30 AM      Canada Caucus
Director: Martin Bressani, McGill University

09:00 AM - 10:30 AM      East Central Caucus
Director: Mo Zell, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 

09:00 AM - 10:30 AM      Gulf Caucus
Director: Francis Lyn, Florida Atlantic University 

09:00 AM - 10:30 AM      Mid Atlantic Caucus
Director: Carlos Reimers, Catholic University of America 

09:00 AM - 10:30 AM      Northeast Caucus
Director: John Cays, New Jersey Institute of Technology 

09:00 AM - 10:30 AM      West Caucus
Director: Ryan Smith, University of Utah 

09:00 AM - 10:30 AM      West Central Caucus
Director: Nadia Anderson, Iowa State University 

10:30 AM - 11:00 AM      Coffee Break
Sponsored by
Birkhäuser : Introduction of Birkhäuser's architectural database 'Building Types online' an innovative tool for research and design practice

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM      Urbanism, History and Theory                                                                            Project Session

Moderator: Avigail Sachs, University of Tennessee-Knoxville
Designers and scholars study and engage the differences between private and public, individual and societal spaces, incorporating buildings and public space in a variety of scales and densities within an increasingly global context. Two well-developed research trajectories are smart growth and new urbanism, and we solicit posters from our members working in these areas. In addition, we are seeking proposals that redefine architecture, urban design, city planning, and life in the cyber-age, in unexpected terms. We recognize that positions taken today may be located on the periphery of the architectural discourse but are poised to make a significant impact tomorrow.
Scholarship on historic architects, settings, periods and themes occurs in a variety of research modalities. In addition ideas of design epistemology are often reflected in essays falling under this broad rubric.

Atomizing the Smart City: Towards a Flexible Infrastructural Urbanism
                        Roy C Cloutier, University of British Columbia 

Building for the Other 90%:  Design Agency + Cultural Housing
                        Ashlie Latiolais, University of Louisiana - Lafayette

Capriccio
                        James Michael Tate, University of Michigan

Green Point Food District
                        David B. Baird, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
                        Torrey Tracy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
                        Steven Clarke, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

NM House. Pantano de San Juan, Madrid. ‘House for a coffee man and a steel woman’
                        Diego Garcia-Setien, Arizona State University

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM       Value by Design – New Frontiers for Architecture
Special Focus Session
Moderator: Ming Hu, AIA
Architectural design is most often understood by the public to be a service- and/or design-driven process. Consequently, architects have been seen as service providers and problem solvers rather than value providers. However, architects are also capable of being value providers, as their skill sets prepare them to serve as connectors, facilitators, community builders and catalysts. With the recent development of advanced digital technologies and smart-building techniques (e.g., energy simulation, 3d fabrication, parametric design), architects, designers and architectural students are expanding their fields of interest.  As a result, there is a need to discuss how value-driven design processes might inform how architects work with clients and communities, as well as how their training might prepare them for work in new industries such as gaming or new roles in governmental service.
This special topic session will focus on the following questions:

- What “value-added” dimensions do architects and designers provide? How do we quantify and measure them?

- What new fields of interest are architects developing?
- How can we help the public recognize our value and help our students pursue emerging career paths?

- What is the role of university faculty/researchers in providing practice-relevant research for evidence-based design?

- How might curricula in architecture change to advance value-driven design?

- Do we require different architecture degree tracks to address these new interests?

This special topic session will start with the introduction of the new value-driven process in architectural design, community planning, product design and business management by the Director of Academic Engagement for the AIA. Following the introduction, three practitioners/firms will discuss their own innovative approaches to value-added design and engage in a moderated panel discussion. Of interest is how architecture schools might best participate in the preparation of students for these newly emerging forms of practice.

                        Panelists:Barbara Klinkhammer, Philadelphia University; Carlos Reimers, Catholic University of America;
                        Francisco Javier Rodriguez, University of Puerto Rico
; Hernan Diaz Alonso, SCI-Arc; John Haymaker,
                        Perkins & Wills
; Tim Dufault , Cuningham Group; & Ron Rochon, Partner, Miller Hull Partnership, LLP 

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM      Technology | Architecture + Design (BTES)
Special Focus Session
Moderator: Robert J. Dermody, Roger Williams University
A presentation of Technology | Architecture + Design, a new peer-reviewed international journal dedicated to the advancement of scholarship in the field of building technology, with a focus on the impact, translation and integration of technology in architecture and design…to be launched by the Building Technology Educator’s Society.  TAD is the only journal that addresses current trends in technology based research from an inclusive, yet focused, perspective dedicated to buildings and their allied mechanisms, artifacts, systems and processes. Participants will be invited to discuss their ideas about sharing new knowledge in how we think, make and use technology within the building arts.  The journal endeavors to feature articles on primary research in emerging materials, construction techniques, design integration, structures, building systems, energy, environmental design, information technology, digital fabrication, sustainability and resiliency, project delivery, the history and theory of technology, and building technology education. Aimed at researchers, educators, and practitioners, the journal advances and transforms the current discourse on building based technologies with the goal of expanding, reimagining and challenging its role for architecture and design.
                        Panelists: Michelle Addington, Yale University; Kiel Moe, Harvard University; Rashida Ng, Temple University;
                        Franca Trubiano, University of Pennsylvania; Marci Uihlein, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign; &
                        Andrzej Zarzycki, New Jersey Institute of Technology

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM      Collaborative Practice Award
Award Session
Moderator: Michael Hughes, American University of Sharjah
Collaborative Practice award honors the best practices in school-based community outreach programs.

Bemis Gardens
                        Jeffrey L. Day, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
                        E.B. Min, California College of the Arts 

Louder than a Bomb
                        Terry Boling, MetroLAB, University of Cincinnati

Fayetteville 2030: Food City Scenario
                        Stephen D. Luoni, University of Arkansas
                        Jeffrey Erwin Huber, Florida Atlantic University 

Project RE_
                        John E. Folan & Urban Design Build Studio (UDBS), Carnegie Mellon
                        University

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM      Divergent Modes of Engagement: Exploring the Spectrum of Collaborative and Participatory Practices: Session 1
Paper Session
Moderator: Caryn Brause, University of Massachusetts, Amherst & Joseph Krupczynski, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

This session explores new collaborative and participatory processes that are restructuring the relationships between all participants in the design process—clients, consultants, fabricators, stakeholders and users. One of two related panels, presenters will focus on the socio-technical realm to explore how emerging project delivery methods, evolving digital workflows, and changing performance requirements are activating collaborative practices within both academic and professional settings.

Breaking Down Myths and Stereotypes: Harnessing and Sharing Architectural Education on Campus
                        Traci Rider

Hybrid Practice: expanding the discipline of architecture
                        Tim Castillo, University of New Mexico
                        Matthew Gines, University of New Mexico

Teaching Integrated Practice: An Integrated Project Delivery Theater
                        Emily M. McGlohn, Mississippi State University
                        Michele Herrmann, Mississippi State University
                        Hans Curtis Herrmann, Mississippi State University

The Rewards of Collaboration: Lessons Learned from Innovative Practices
                        Clare Olsen, California Polytechnic State University
                        Sinead Mac Namara, Syracuse University

 

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM      Knowledge Fields: Between Architecture and Landscape: Session 1
Paper Session
Moderator: Cathryn Dwyre, Pratt Institute & Chris Perry, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Set within this historical and theoretical context, our panel will explore contemporary forms of design research as it relates to knowledge fields situated between architecture and landscape architecture. As such, we welcome submissions investigating historical and theoretical issues, as well as design research and/or proposals.

[un]described fields of the Great Plains
                        David Karle, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Planets, Landscapes and Bodies: the body as landscape
                        Carla Leitao, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Sculptures, Bulldozers and Suburban Landscapes, or, Notes for an Alternative History of Suburbia
                        David Salomon, Ithaca College

The Story of a lump; Charles Jenck's diagram, garden and the law of diminishing erections
                        Lydia Kallipoliti, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM      Knowledge in the Public Interest
Paper Session
Moderator: Nadia M. Anderson, Iowa State University & Sergio Palleroni, Portland State University
This session asks, “What is the knowledge produced by contemporary public interest design and how is it related to other types of knowledge produced or utilized by the discipline of architecture?” Community design can, for example, be a producer of operational knowledge that informs structures of practice. Through methods that bring the architect and the architectural student into direct contact with communities, this work draws upon areas such as grounded theory, community organizing, and art activism. It also redefines financial structures by moving away from fees based on building construction to fees resulting from grants and public/private partnerships that emphasize engaged research and process over product. These structures in turn produce new knowledge of what architecture as a discipline is and what its power relationships are.  

Constitutional: Finnish Frameworks of Architecture in the Public Sector and Design for Government
                        Frances Hsu, Aalto University

Exhibition as a Pedagogical Tool for Experimental and Public Architecture
                        Zenovia Toloudi, Dartmouth College

Gentrification and the Heterogeneous City: Finding a Role for Design
                        Sally Harrison, Temple University
                        Andrew Jacobs

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM      Standard Deviation: Session 1
Paper Session

Moderator: Kelly Bair, University of Illinois at Chicago
A quick scroll through recent symposium titles, exhibition catalogs, and syllabi scans show an evolving interest in projects that, for the purposes of this session topic, we will refer to as “standard deviations”. Standard Deviation projects typically challenge the conceptual arguments and conventional mediums upon which they are founded. This session seeks to uncover new types of knowledge that are gained by deviating from architectural standards within the academy as well as speculate on their potential effects on the profession.

Atria Fatigue
                        Jennifer Bonner, Harvard University

Bad Lines
                        Kyle Reynolds, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Great (with a Strikethrough) Expectations
                        Andrew Atwood, University of California, Berkeley

Long Distance Architecture
                        Samuel Stewart-Halevy, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

12:30 PM - 02:30 PM      ACSA Business Meeting & Lunch 
President: Marilys Nepomechie, Florida International University 

02:30 PM - 04:00 PM     Design Research & Building Behaviors ONE
Project Session
Moderator:         Chris Ford, Stanford University
The studio is the traditional core of the architecture school. The 1996 Boyer Report on architectural education described it as the “holy of holies” of architectural education: “these studios scruffy though they may be are models for creative learning that others on campus might well think about.” Since the Boyer report was written design has become a hot trans-disciplinary phenomenon, putting the architecture studio in an enviable position relative to our peers in the academy. This topic might include research done on the design studio or research done in the design studio.

Cooling Oculus - A Passive Prototype
                        Dorit Aviv, The Cooper Union

EcoTechnoHub:   UpCycling of an Obsolete WaterTreatment Plant
                        Diego Garcia-Setien, Arizona State University

Responsive Facades_ Solar Petal Field
                        Dale Clifford, California Polytechnic State University

Thermally Responsive Materials
                        Dale Clifford, California Polytechnic State University
                        Jeff Ponitz, California Polytechnic State University 

02:30 PM - 04:00 PM      Divergent Modes of Engagement: Exploring the Spectrum of Collaborative and Participatory Practices: Session 2
Paper Session
Moderator: Caryn Brause, University of Massachusetts, Amherst & Joseph Krupczynski, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

This session explores new collaborative and participatory processes that are restructuring the relationships between all participants in the design process—clients, consultants, fabricators, stakeholders and users. One of two related panels, presenters will focus on social, cultural, material and participatory contexts that work across a wide range of practices including public interest design, transformative collaboration with local communities and a re-setting of academic, activist, professional, and governmental agency.

Crossing Boundaries: Collaborative Architectural Practices in Late-Apartheid Cape Town
                        Sharone Tomer, University of California, Berkeley

Designers, Citizens, Citizen-Designers: charting new modes of engagement, collaboration and project outcomes at Tulane City Center
                        Emilie Taylor
                        Maggie Hansen, Tulane University
                        Sue Mobley, Tulane University
                        Nick Jenisch

Stone Soup and the Catalytic Power of Participatory Practice
                        Phoebe Crisman, University of Virginia

02:30 PM - 04:00 PM

How to Succeed at Research by Really Trying
Special Focus Session
Panelists: Mark C. Childs, University of New Mexico; Renée Cheng, University of Minnesota; & Gregory A. Luhan, University of Kentucky
Many architecture schools are part of colleges and universities where research is an expectation. Often research success is measured against standards developed in one of two well established models: humanities or science. Architecture, design and creative practice share similarities with aspects of both humanities and science-based research, explicit measures of research success in the creative fields range widely and can be seen as arbitrary or ambiguous. What are the metrics we should be promoting to measure and demonstrate our research success? How should schools articulate and negotiate the difference between readily accepted university definitions of research and those emerging from architectural modes of inquiry? Should architecture schools have different ‘tracks’ for ‘research’ and ‘critical practice’ faculty, as many medical schools do?  How might ‘productivity’ be measured across different modes of applied, creative, and scholarly research? How can schools articulate and promote new knowledges?
Faculty navigating the academic research landscape can benefit from the perspectives of administrators specifically focused on research, usually called the associate dean for research (ADR).

Three architecture faculty members appointed as the ADR for their programs will present experiences from large research intensive institutions and discuss models that can work in a broad range of institutional settings. The outcomes of these two sessions (How to Succeed at Research by Really Trying & The How of Research Domains Workshop) will form the basis of a research white paper and conference workshop presentation at the 2017 ARCC conference focusing on research needs in architecture. 

02:30 PM - 04:00 PM      Knowledge Fields: Between Architecture and Landscape: Session 2
Paper Session
Moderator: Cathryn Dwyre, Pratt Institute
& Chris Perry, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Set within this historical and theoretical context, our panel will explore contemporary forms of design research as it relates to knowledge fields situated between architecture and landscape architecture. As such, we welcome submissions investigating historical and theoretical issues, as well as design research and/or proposals.

Contested Terrain: Professional Jurisdiction as a Frame for Analyzing the Architecture/Landscape Divide
                        Zachary Tate Porter, SCI-Arc
 

Planning As A Systemic Catalyst
                        Bradford Watson, Montana State University
 

Topologies of Exclusion
                        Kathy Velikov, University of Michigan
 

02:30 PM - 04:00 PM     Beginning Design (NCBDS31, University of Houston)
Special Focus Session
Moderator: Meg Jackson, University of Houston
The National Conference on the Beginning Design Student (NCBDS) is a national peer review scholarly gathering dedicated to the study and practice of beginning design education. For over 30 years, the NCBDS has provided a forum for design educators to present papers and projects and hold discussions related to introductory design issues. NCBDS31 was hosted in 2015 by the Gerald D Hines College of Architecture and Design at the University of Houston. This session will feature paper presentations representing the NCBDS31 conference proceedings.

The Beginning Design Conference: Its History and Culture
                        James Sullivan, Marywood University
 

Questioning Fundamentals: Pedagogical Experimentation in Beginning Design Studio
                        Clare Olsen, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

What? Wow!

                        Catherine Wetzel, Illinois Institute of Technology 

Prototypes + Craft: A Hybrid Approach to Beginning Interactive Design
                        Michael Gonzales, University of Houston 
                        Meg Jackson, University of Houston
 

Desk: Where Ideas Rise and Fall
                        Anne Patterson, University of Kansas
 

02:30 PM - 04:00 PM      New Faculty Teaching Award
Award Session
Moderator: Joel Pominville, American Institute of Architecture Students

New Faculty Teaching Award  recognizes demonstrated excellence in teaching performance during the formative years of an architectural teaching career.
 

Erin Carraher, University of Utah 

Lisa Huang, University of Florida

Adam Marcus, California College of the Arts 

02:30 PM - 04:00 PM      Standard Deviation: Session 2
Paper Session
Moderator: Kelly Bair, University of Illinois at Chicago

A quick scroll through recent symposium titles, exhibition catalogs, and syllabi scans show an evolving interest in projects that, for the purposes of this session topic, we will refer to as “standard deviations”. Standard Deviation projects typically challenge the conceptual arguments and conventional mediums upon which they are founded. This session seeks to uncover new types of knowledge that are gained by deviating from architectural standards within the academy as well as speculate on their potential effects on the profession.

A Mass of Things that would Approximate a Wall
                        Andrew Holder, Harvard University

Darlings
                        Clark Thenhaus, California College of the Arts

Deviating from Convention: Finding Opportunities in Errors
                        James Kerestes, Ball State University

No Rhyme or Reason: The Whimsicality of Folk Art Environments
                        Molly Hunker, Syracuse University

                        Gregory Corso, Syracuse University
 

02:30 PM - 04:00 PM      Structure as Design Knowledge
Paper Session
Moderator: Marci S. Uihlein, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Robert J. Dermody, Roger Williams University; & Tyler Sprague, University of Washington
This session will explore the exchange between structure and architecture today.  Though the requisite utility of structure as the means to ‘stand-up’ has persisted throughout time, the understanding, designing, integrating, constructing and assessing of structure have become more complex.  Advances in material analysis and fabrication have led to a new generation of architectural/structural pursuits.  This session will investigate and expose how structure, as a knowledge-creating framework, enhances/ compliments architectural design.  What are the consequences when architectural design is generated from structural thinking?
 

Overhang: corbelled structural systems
                        Georg Rafailidis, University At Buffalo, SUNY

Model Behavior: The Evolving Use of Physical Prototypes in Structural Shell Design, 1959-1974
                        Rob Whitehead, Iowa State University

Transparent Structures
                        Beverly Choe, Stanford University

                        Jun Sato
 

Structure, Architecture, and Computation: Past and Future
                        Renaud Danhaive, MIT

04:30 PM - 06:00 PM      Design Research & Building Behaviors TWO
Project Session
Moderator: Vivian Lee, University of Toronto

The studio is the traditional core of the architecture school. The 1996 Boyer Report on architectural education described it as the “holy of holies” of architectural education: “these studios scruffy though they may be are models for creative learning that others on campus might well think about.” Since the Boyer report was written design has become a hot trans-disciplinary phenomenon, putting the architecture studio in an enviable position relative to our peers in the academy. This topic might include research done on the design studio or research done in the design studio.

faBRICK: temporary pavilion
                        Mo Zell, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Keswa
                        Emily Baker, Tulane University

Object Fields
                        Nerea Feliz, University of Texas at Austin

Rapturous South: A Retroactive Manifesto
                        Brian M. Ambroziak, University of Tennessee-Knoxville

 

04:30 PM - 06:00 PM      Partnerships in Health & Resilience
Special Focus Session
Sponsored by the American Institute of Architects
Moderator: Suzanna Kelley, American Institute of Architects

Panelists: Heather Burpee, University of Washington College of Built Environments; Howard Frumkin, University of Washington School of Public Health; & Stephen Luoni, University of Arkansas
Architecture schools are expanding their partnerships in both teaching and research to realize greater impact on local communities. This panel features speakers working on the nexus of design and health and design and resilience. With participation from the audience, discussions will focus on efforts to develop a knowledge base supporting the connection between design and health and efforts to create resilience studios that connect faculty and students with practicing architects and community stakeholders. 

04:30 PM - 06:00 PM      Diversity Achievement Award
Award Session
Moderator:         Rashida Ng, Temple University

Diversity Achievement Award recognizes the work of faculty, administrators, or students in creating effective methods and models to achieve greater diversity in curricula, school personnel, and student bodies, specifically to incorporate the participation and contributions of historically under-represented groups or contexts.

Kiwana T. McClung, University of Louisiana - Lafayette 

Collaborative Team: Jason Logan, Gregory Marinic, Ziad Qureshi, Josh Robbins and Susan Rogers, University of Houston

Greg Donofrio, University of Minnesota

04:30 PM - 06:00 PM      International Design/Build: Community Service or Architectural Imperialism
Paper Session
Moderator: Lisa Findley, California College of the Arts

How are we dealing with these challenging questions about a mode of pedagogy that sometimes achieves a high degree of integration of certain kinds of research with practice? As a pivotal player in architectural education, ACSA and its members should be actively engaged in this global debate about international design/build studio projects.

Investigating the African City: Rem Koolhaas, Jacques Herzog, Pierre de Meuron, and Others
                        Elisa Dainese, University of Pennsylvania

Practicing Humility in Design: Understanding context and community engagement in international projects
                        Megan Elizabeth Reineccius, Opticos Design Inc.

UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES
                        Michael Zaretsky, University of Cincinnati

Success From the Bottom UP - Lessons Learning in Haiti's Arcahaie Region
                        Steven Fett, University of Miami

                        Jaime Correa, University of Miami
 

04:30 PM - 06:00 PM      Making It: Labor, Participatory Architecture, and the Politics of the Algorithm
Paper Session
Moderator: Anya Sirota, University of Michigan
& Christian Stayner
This panel seeks research and pedagogical positions that investigate, confront, and question the labor involved in contemporary architectural production: from the space of the academic studio (or fabrication lab), to the very physical labor of the construction site, to the assembly site of so many recent architectural pavilions produced through the laborious aggregation of digitally-produced elements. How can labor and material relations be understood as a new knowledge in themselves? How could we turn the tide against the devaluation of architectural labor? What distinction should be made between architecture as the result of physical toil versus an intellectual service? How might we as participants in architectural production re-conceptualize our value? How do we position our discipline in relation to the production economy? These are some of the questions we seek to investigate in this panel discussion.

Assemblies of Labor
                        Wei-Han Vivian Lee, University of Toronto

                        James D Macgillivray, University of Toronto

CAMPO VACCINO A Drawing Exercise Not Found In The Ching Book
                        James Michael Tate, University of Michigan

Concrete Labor
                        Tsz Yan Ng, University of Michigan

General Contractors and Architects' Distance from Labor
                        George B. Johnston, Georgia Institute of Technology

04:30 PM - 06:00 PM      Probing Technique: Building Research in Architecture’s Modernity: Session 1
Paper Session
Moderator: Alexandra Quantrill, Columbia University & Anna-Maria Meister, Princeton University
This session examines the interrelation of technical building research, design practices, and the discourse and representation of architecture. Beyond appearances and tectonics, we want to explore shifts in the epistemology of architecture through its material research. We are interested in the suppressions and celebrations of such research in conventional accounts of architecture, and the local and global contexts for the export and translation of techniques, where architecture was a repeated agent in the dissemination of standards and aesthetics—hence, politics.

Communicating with Machines: Bezier Curve as 'Informational Ontology'
                        AnnMarie Brennan, University of Melbourne

Performance
                        Elijah Huge, Wesleyan University

Transfers of Modernism: Constructing Soviet Postwar Urbanity
                        Masha Panteleyeva, Princeton University
 

04:30 PM - 06:00 PM      The How of Research Domains Workshop
ACSA/ARCC Special Focus Session
                        Panelists John Cays, New Jersey Institute of Technology; Gregory A. Luhan, University of Kentucky; Ryan
                        Smith, University of Utah
; & Michelle Rinehart, Georgia Institute of Technology
This session will be conducted in a workshop format. Participants will be grouped by broad research domains that include: Practice and Projects; Protocols and Policies; Pedagogy; Products; and Processes. Each group will be asked to collectively outline sub-domains within the larger domain and articulate the methods of research in that domain, outline potential sources of funding, identify partnerships that have been used or may be needed to accomplish that research, articulate any special considerations in conducting that research and finally, present the possible venues for the research dissemination. The participants will come back together at the end of the workshop to share their findings.

The outcomes of these two sessions (How to Succeed at Research by Really Trying & The How of Research Domains Workshop) will form the basis of a research white paper and conference workshop presentation at the 2017 ARCC conference focusing on research needs in architecture. 

04:30 PM - 06:00 PM       The Architecture of History: Session 1
Paper Session
Moderator: Joseph Heathcott, Parsons The New School for Design
This panel examines the scaffolding of historical imagination as it relates to architecture.  It is not about the history of architecture per se, but rather considers the nature of history itself with respect to architecture and, more precisely, to the training of architects in an age of increasing digital nativity. 

A Geneaology of Drawings: The Evolution of Fine-arts Architectural Education
                        Yanze Wang, Southeast University

Inventing History
                        Liane A. Hancock, Louisiana Tech University

Le Corbusier’s Museum of Unlimited Extension: Spirals and Occlusion Maps
                        Mike Christenson, North Dakota State University

Provoking the ‘Thingness’ of History: The Anti-Teleological Hermeneutics of Steen Eiler Rasmussen
                        Anthony Raynsford, San Jose State University

06:00 PM - 06:30 PM      Coffee Break

06:30 PM - 07:30 PM      Distinguished Professor  & 2016 Topaz Laurette, Douglas S. Kelbaugh

07:30 PM - 08:30 PM
      Awards Reception

 SATURDAY, MARCH 19, 2016                                                                                                                       

8:30 AM - 04:30 PM      Registration                                                                                                            

09:00 AM - 02:30 PM
      Exhibit Hall                                                                       

09:00 AM - 10:30 AM      Materials and Media Investigations ONE                                                       
Project Session
Moderator: Emily Baker, Tulane University
In recent years the convergence of new manufacturing processes and new materials has led to a proliferation of material studies with spatial, economic and societal implications. In addition, traditional materials and their methods of fabrication continue to hold interest for researchers and offer new information to the construction industry. Theories and practices of media and representation, ranging from historic drawing techniques to contemporary digital modalities, are critical to the production of architectural ideas. Scholars and designers often focus their inquiries on this key link in the design process.

Agency of Materials
                        Daniel M. Baerlecken, Georgia Institute of Technology

                        Judith Reitz, DESIGNDEVELOPBUILD

                        Katherine Wright, Georgia Institute of Technology

                        Bernadette Heiermann, RWTH Aachen University

                        Nora Mueller, RWTH Aachen University

Choreographing a Logic of Assembly
                        Kristopher Palagi, Louisiana State University

Glass House
                        Jin Young Song, University At Buffalo, SUNY

                        Paul Battaglia, University At Buffalo, SUNY

Medusa, Making Ways and Ways of Making
                        Olivier Ottevaere

09:00 AM - 10:30 AM      Beginnings in the Context of New Knowledge
Paper Session
Moderator: Catherine Wetzel, Illinois Institute of Technology
& James Sullivan, Louisiana State University
This session considers the context and content of the foundation knowledge set and its associative pedagogies within the new knowledge culture of research and innovation. In doing so, the session looks to address: the re-valuation of design processes and aesthetics challenging the relationship of beginning design and the broader design disciplines; the challenges that the new knowledge culture presents to the permanence of architectural topics; the content and curricular structures of foundation knowledge, among other issues. This session seeks submissions that consider “beginnings as a first point of an accomplishment or process that has duration or meaning,”  and therefore sees the foundation as fertile ground for the deployment of projective practice.

 

First Impressions: Moholy–Nagy and the Prototype in the Curriculum
                        Jodi La Coe, Virginia Tech

Stirring the Pot: Theory and Beginning Design
                        Robert M. Arens, California Polytechnic State University

Unprincipled : toward new values for foundations education in architecture
                        Patrick Rhodes, American University of Sharjah
 

09:00 AM - 10:30 AM      Open: Hoarding, Updating, Drafting: The Production of Knowledge in Architectural History
Paper Session
Moderator: Sarah Stevens, University of British Columbia

This session’s papers coalesce around questions about how historians of architecture produce knowledge. Whether by looking sidelong at British architectural publications to find anxieties about national identity and authorship, or by reading the interpretations of a monument of modernism for its associations with a previous era, these papers broaden our understanding of supposedly discreet architectural movements. The third paper addresses practice, by showing the introduction of the working drawing in late 19th century Britain as a site of architectural expertise to reveal how knowledge-making shaped architectural design and production.

Hoarding Knowledge: FR Yerbury and Howard Robertson’s Records of the Modern Movement
                        Jasmine Benyamin, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Modernism or Mannerism: Villa Stein-de Monzie and the Updating Knowledge of Modern Architecture
                        Zhengyang Hua, Iowa State University

Drafting Knowledge: The Victorian Architect as Masterful Dictator
                        Katherine Wheeler, University of Miami
 

09:00 AM - 10:30 AM      Water, Water Everywhere…: Session 1
Paper Session
Moderator: Jori A. Erdman, Louisiana State University

Given the multivalent crises of water that we face globally, how can architecture respond in the contemporary context? How do we simultaneously resist the destructive capacity of water and yet invite it into our communities and buildings through controlled apertures and channels? This session will present papers and design research projects that address the relationship of architecture to water at all scales. Potential areas of investigation include: regional scale responses to water such as the Roman aqueduct system; urban scale projects such as Latrobe’s water works or Venice; building scale responses such as roof and wall systems; or more idiosyncratic responses such as devices for storage or removal. Submissions should focus on contemporary conditions as the ground for exploration and discussion. The problems demand design investigations that are poetic, technological, innovative and speculative for a world in which there is simultaneously too much and too little water for sustained human inhabitation.

Lines of resilience and interdependence in Kampung Melayu, Jakarta
                        Adrianne Wilson Joergensen, ETH Zürich

                        Alexander Lehnerer, ETH Zürich
 

Making Space for Water: Building Resilience Amidst Norfolk’s Rising Tide
                        Phoebe Crisman, University of Virginia

Rising Tides | Changing Lives
                        Nikole Bouchard, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
 

Transitional States: Hydraulic history and architectural activism
                        Catherine Bonier, Louisiana State University
 

09:00 AM - 10:30 AM      Practice and Leadership Award
Award Session
Moderator: Nadia Anderson, Iowa State Univeristy

Practice and Leadership Award recognizes “best practice” examples of highly effective teaching, scholarship, and outreach in the areas of professional practice and leadership.

Building Stories
                        Renee Cheng, University of Minnesota

Voices from the Field
                        Caryn Brause, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Public Interest Architecture Program
                        Georgia Bizios, North Carolina State University

09:00 AM - 10:30 AM      Design Build Award
Award Session
Moderator: Ryan Smith, University of Utah
Design Build Award honors the best practices in school-based design-build projects.

c u b e
                        Patrick Doan, William U. Galloway & Frank Weiner, Virginia Tech

Camp Daisy Hindman in Dover, Kansas
                        David Dowell, Kansas State University

Lamar Station Classroom for Urban Farming
                        Rick Sommerfeld, University of Colorado Denver

Colorado Outward Bound Micro Cabins
                        Rick Sommerfeld, University of Colorado Denver

09:00 AM - 10:30 AM      Partnerships with Community Colleges: Community College Architecture Program Transfer Strategies
Special Focus Session
                        Panelists: Randy Steiner, Montgomery College; David Edwards, Spokane College; David Wang, Washington
                        State University
; Michael Connor, San Antonio College; Vincent B. Canizaro, University of Texas, SanAntonio
                        Respondents: Mo Zell, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
; Greg Hall, Mississippi State University; &
                        Shannon Criss, University of Kansas

With growing pressures to minimize student debt, keep enrollments up, and expand the demographic and economic diversity of students joining the profession, community colleges have emerged as a key partner for architecture schools. Join us for a round table discussion about model articulation agreements and the strategies of curriculum transfer.  Panelists from Coalition of Community College Architecture Programs [or CCCAP] and ACSA member schools will summarize local and national models while framing the advantages and disadvantages to these strategies.
 

10:30 AM - 11:00 AM      Coffee Break

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM      Materials and Media Investigations TWO
Project Session
Moderator: Rob Corser, University of Washington
In recent years the convergence of new manufacturing processes and new materials has led to a proliferation of material studies with spatial, economic and societal implications. In addition, traditional materials and their methods of fabrication continue to hold interest for researchers and offer new information to the construction industry. Theories and practices of media and representation, ranging from historic drawing techniques to contemporary digital modalities, are critical to the production of architectural ideas. Scholars and designers often focus their inquiries on this key link in the design process.

Nameless Curves
                        Mark Ericson, Woodbury University

Osnap!
                        Lee Su Huang, University of Florida

                        Gregory Spaw, American University of Sharjah

Pattern to Volume
                        Jeff Ponitz, California Polytechnic State University

The Strange Loop
                        Mara Marcu, University of Cincinnati

                        Ming Tang, University of Cincinnati
 

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM      Giving up Control: Finding New Agency in the Era of Interdisciplinary Practice
Paper Session
Moderator: Blaine E. Brownell, University of Minnesota
; Blair Satterfield, University of British Columbia; & Marc Swackhamer, University of Minnesota
Architects increasingly look to external agents for influence in order to expand design opportunities. This influence might come from a digitally-automated approach to making form, a careful accounting of complex environmental forces, a multi-disciplinary collaboration, or a crowd-sourcing model. Is this trend leading to new opportunities? Is removal of traditional authorial limits empowering or is interdisciplinarity and an emphasis on means-and-methods a threat to the architect’s agency? Did architects ever really have complete autonomy and agency over their work?

Educating for An Embodied Culture of Building
                        Chad Kraus, University of Kansas

                        Nils Gore, University of Kansas
 

How to Use This Book: Guidance in a Permissive Society.
                        Janette Kim, Syracuse University

Our Model of Models: As If We Ever Had Control
                        Kiel Moe, Harvard University

Where Knowledge Resides: Exploring Architecture Of Learning And Knowing From The Community Of Practice Perspective
                       
Amin Mojtahedi, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 

 

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM      Open: Critical Call
Paper Session
Moderator: Maurizio R. Sabini, Drury University

With the advance of new forms of knowledge production and dissemination, with digital technology and social media disrupting established paradigms and protocols, how can architecture, as a form of culture and knowledge, strengthen its critical agency? By critically revisiting the legacy of the Italian "Tendenza," evaluating case-studies that illustrate the imaginative power of criticality, and elaborating an argument for the “ethical reason” sustaining architecture’s critical call, this session wants to stimulate a conversation on crucial aspects of architecture’s fundamental ethos.

Planning Criticism: Operative Contingencies in the Project of the Italian Tendenza
                        Pasquale De Paola, Louisiana Tech University

The Act and Art of Architectural Critique: A Drawing, a House, and a Sign
                        Andreea Mihalache, Mississippi State University

Towards an Ethical Technique: Reframing Architecture's "Critical Call" through Hannah Arendt
                        Paul Holmquist, Carleton University

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM      Open: Intelligent Architectural Settings: Tools for Societal and Programmatic Performance Analytics
Paper Session
Moderator: Christopher J. Beorkrem, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
& Eric Sauda, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
There are two specific outcomes of research that may be included in this session. First projects that combine a fine-grained understanding of the uses that are made of facilities, leading to improved future design. And second, the generation of intelligent architectural settings, which integrate architectural, ethnographic and data analytic approaches, to create settings which can adapt to both the individual and the group.  Work at all scales from the intimate to the urban is welcome.

Compressed-­‐Pattern Robotic Architecture [CoPRA]: A Research Though Design Exemplar for Intelligent Architectural Settings of the Information AgeA]: A Research Though Design Exemplar for Intelligent Architectural Settings of the Information Age
                        Keith Evan Green, Clemson University

                        Yixiao Wang, Clemson University

Data-Driven Design Process for Human Interaction, Urban Metabolism, Health and Well-Being, and Urban Ecotones in Smart Cities
                        Saleh Kalantari, Washington State University

                        Darrin Grechin, Washington State University

                        Judith Ann Theodorson, Washington State University

                        Steve Austin, Washington State University

Embedded and Interconnected Buildings: Toward Intelligent Architecture
                        Andrzej Zarzycki, New Jersey Institute of Technology

Protean Prototypes: Assembling Urban Platforms for Appropriation
                        Geoffrey Thun, University of Michigan

                        Kathy Velikov, University of Michigan

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM      Water, Water Everywhere…: Session 2
Paper Session
Moderator: Jori A. Erdman, Louisiana State University

Given the multivalent crises of water that we face globally, how can architecture respond in the contemporary context? How do we simultaneously resist the destructive capacity of water and yet invite it into our communities and buildings through controlled apertures and channels? This session will present papers and design research projects that address the relationship of architecture to water at all scales. Potential areas of investigation include: regional scale responses to water such as the Roman aqueduct system; urban scale projects such as Latrobe’s water works or Venice; building scale responses such as roof and wall systems; or more idiosyncratic responses such as devices for storage or removal. Submissions should focus on contemporary conditions as the ground for exploration and discussion. The problems demand design investigations that are poetic, technological, innovative and speculative for a world in which there is simultaneously too much and too little water for sustained human inhabitation.

Future-Proofing Water Infrastructure from an Economic and Hazard Resilience Perspective
                        Brian Rich, University of Washington

                        Meghan Gattuso, University of Washington

Remaking water legible: a prototype for a communicative landscape
                        Michelle Laboy, Northeastern University

Retreat
                        Suzanne Lettieri, Cornell University

To Defend, Retreat or Adapt?  Design Responses to the excess and disappearance of water
                        Seth McDowell, University of Virginia
 

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM      Faculty Design Award
Award Session
Moderator: Hsinming Fung, Southern California Institute of Architecture

Faculty Design Award  provides a venue for work that advances the reflective nature of practice and teaching by recognizing and encouraging outstanding work in architecture and related environmental design fields as a critical endeavor.

Durotaxis Chair
                        Alvin Huang, University of Southern California

Learning from the Countryside
                        Taiji Miyasaka, Washington State University

Electroform(alism)
                        Anya Sirota, University of Michigan

Blue Barn Theatre & Boxcar 10
                        Jeffrey L. Day, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

                        E.B. Min, California College of the Arts

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM      Housing Design Education Award
Award Session
Moderator: John Cays, New Jersey Institute of Technology

Housing Design Education Award recognizes the importance of good education in housing design in a wide range of areas and able to be capable leaders and contributors to their communities.

University of Oregon Housing Specialization Program
                        Michael Fifield, Peter A. Keyes, & Rob Thallon, University of Oregon 

The Invisible Houses
                        Gonzalo Lizarralde, Universite de Montreal 

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM      Leveraging Student Leadership (AIAS Panel Discussion)
Special Focus Session
Moderator: Nick Serfass, American Institute of Architecture Students
The American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) offers excellent opportunities for students to participate in leadership and service activities at department, university, community, regional, and national levels. It also provides opportunities for students to engage with leaders of architecture firms and professional organizations through local and regional activities such as annual quad conferences and national activities such as AIAS Forum and AIAS Grassroots—the largest annual assemblies of architecture students in the world. This panel of AIAS leaders, faculty, and administrators will explore ways in which faculty and administration can support student AIAS members and AIAS chapters as well as ways in which members and chapters can support the goals and mission of architecture faculty and departments.

                        Panelists: Greg Hall, Mississippi State University
; Gregory Laramie, Roger Williams University; Rachel Law,
                        American Institute of Architecture Students
; & Joel Pominville, American Institute of Architecture Students

11:00 AM - 12:30 AM      Positions on Smart Environments
Special Focus Session
Moderators: Mona El Khafif, University of Waterloo & David Gerber, University of Southern California

Movement toward ubiquitous computing is enabling a new generation of smart environments that is changing the architecture profession and giving us pause for critical reflection. While we can point to the digital as a revolution for architecture and urbanism in design, in operation, and in the political realm, can we point to its failures and successes?This panel addresses a diverse set of scales, modes, models and philosophies, and invites dialogue as to what defines Smart Environments.

                        Panelists: Burcin Becerik-Gerber, University of Southern California; Ila Berman, University of Waterloo; Nataly
                        Gattegno, California College of the Art
; Jose Sanchez, University of Southern California; Andres Sevtsuk,
                        Harvard University
; & Kathy Velikov, University of Michigan 

12:30 PM - 4:30 PM      Self-Guided Tours
Pick-up self-guided tour brochure or check your mobile conference app to explore the city, sites & buildings.

12:30 PM - 2:00 PM      Women’s Leadership Council / The Missing 32%
Special Focus Session
Please join us to discuss and plan activities connected to promoting and supporting women in academic positions in architecture. With the current interest in the Equity by Design/Missing 32% Group and ACSA’s collaboration with them on an upcoming survey, this session will focus on steps to take in response to the new data.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM      High Performance Buildings
Applied Research and Implementation at the U.W.'s Center for Integrated Design                 
Bullitt Center

Special Focus Session / Offsite Event                                                                 

                        Panelists: Heather Burpee, University of Washington
& Rob Peña, University of Washington
This session will explore how research drives implementation of high performance ideas as well as how research can help evaluate the successes and failures of high performance buildings.  The exploration will highlight the University of Washington Center for Integrated Design's research program where research has direct impacts on high performance design practice. This session will include a tour of the Bullitt Center, where participants will get to "kick the tires" of the alternative building systems, including water systems, energy systems, and material systems.  The presenters will provide background on the project, highlight sustainable features that set the building apart from the norm, and present their research both pre and post occupancy on energy, daylight, and health related attributes of the building.

This session has limited space and requires pre-confirmation to attend. Only the first 40 attendees to register for this event will be allowed to participate. To register please email BullittCenter@acsa-arch.org with your full-name and affiliation.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM      Mass Timber: Design, Fabrication, Education
Special Focus Session
                        Panelists: Todd Beyreuther, Washington State University; Susan Jones, University of Washington; Kate
                        Simonen, University of Washington; & Ryan E Smith, University of Utah
Technique and technologies are socially contingent and dependent.  That is, design and building methods emerge from the desires and needs of societies; and the advances in construction influences societal values.  Advances in wood technology and interest in low carbon building has captured the imagination of architects. This can be attributed to a confluence of forces: technical, social, environmental, and aesthetic.  This session presents opportunities and challenges in contemporary mass wood architectural practice, research and education.

04:30 PM - 06:00 PM      Closing Keynote Panel @ University of Washington 
                        Moderator: Daniel S. Friedman, University of Hawaii at Manoa
                        Panelists: Michelle Addington, Yale University

                        Billie Faircloth, KieranTimberlake

                        John Haymaker, Perkins+Will
                        Kiel Moe, Harvard Univeristy

06:00 PM - 07:30 PM      University of Washington, Closing Reception
                        Sponsored by:
                       
University of Washington, Department of Architecture
                        University of Washington, College of Built Environments
                        University of Washington, Department of Architecture Professional Advisory Council (PAC)



Shaping New Knowledges

March 17-19, 2016  |  Seattle, WA
Host School: University of Washington
Co-chairs: Robert Corser, University of Washington & Sharon Haar, University of Michigan