Faculty Resource

ACSA Conference Keynotes

Opening Keynote: Expanding the View of the Profession

Session Description

Conveners

Lynne Dearborn, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Jason Pugh, National Organization of Minority Architects
Tiffany Brown, National Organization of Minority Architects
Kwesi Daniels, Tuskegee University
William Collins, ZGF Architects

What will it take for the architecture profession to catch up to the changing demographics of the United States and Canada? We kick off the 109th ACSA Annual Meeting with a panel of speakers from the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) to discuss their efforts to double the number of Black architects by 2030 and what change in the academy and the profession is happening now and needs to happen urgently.

2021 Awards Toast & Topaz Keynote

Session Description

For more than four decades, ACSA Distinguished Professor Kathryn Anthony, PhD, has been one of the profession’s most prominent guiding forces, long urging architects and the public to embrace the importance of designing spaces for people and designing for diversity. Having influenced a long list of distinguished architects and educators around the world, Anthony is widely recognized for placing diversity, inclusion, and social justice at the forefront of her pedagogy.

“In a time where the Black Lives Matter movement is challenging us to act with agency and thoughtfulness, with respect and responsiveness, her profound work underscores the importance of social justice in all fields, especially ours,” Frances Bronet, president of the Pratt Institute, wrote in support of Anthony’s nomination. “She built on a legacy of architecture to make more vital and engaging public places that reflect the diversity of the American people.”

2021 Tau Sigma Delta, Gold Medal Keynote

Session Description

Johnpaul Jones is the recipients of the 2021 Tau Sigma Delta (TSD) Honor Society in Architecture and Allied Arts, Gold Medal.

Johnpaul Jones has a distinguished 52-year career as an architect and founding partner of Jones & Jones.  Earning his Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Oregon in 1967, his design philosophy emerged from his Choctaw-Cherokee ancestors, which connects his work to the natural world, animal world, spirit world, and human world.
Mr. Jones’ designs have won widespread acclaim for their reverence for the earth, for paying deep respect to regional Indigenous architectural traditions and native landscapes, and for heightening understanding of Indigenous People and their diverse Native cultures of America. Johnpaul has led the design of numerous cultural centers and museums with tribes spanning the North American continent, culminating in his 12-year engagement as overall lead design consultant for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian on the Mall in Washington, D.C.

A Fellow in the American Institute of Architects, his designs have won a stream of local and national awards.  His awards include the 2005 Distinguished Service Award from the University of Oregon (his alma mater), the AIA Seattle Medal (2006), the Executive Excellence Award from the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (2006), the Pietro Belluschi Distinguished Professorship from the University of Oregon (2011), the Island Treasure Award from the Bainbridge Island Art and Humanities Council (2013), the Washington State Governor’s Heritage Award (2014), and the National Humanities Medal from the National Endowment for the Humanities (2014) conferred by President Barack Obama.

Opening Keynote: Margaret O’Mara

Session Description

Margaret is a historian of modern America who writes and teaches about the history of the technology industry, American politics, and the connections between the two. She is also a contributing opinion writer at The New York Times. Her most recent book is The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America.

More biographical information and links to selected publications can be found on Margaret’s website, margaretomara.com.

Alternative Pedagogies: Indigenous & Pedagogies Presentation

Session Description

Conveners

Malini Srivastava, University of Minnesota
Theodore Jojola, Indigenous Design + Planning Institute & University of New Mexico
Tamarah Begay, Indigenous Design Studio + Architecture & University of New Mexico
David Fortin, David T. Fortin Architect Inc. & Laurentian University
Chris Cornelius, studio:indigenous & University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Rau Hoskins, TRIBE Architects & UNITEC Institute of Technology

In this panel we hear from five distinguished Indigenous architects who practice as designers, planners, and community organizers while making extensive contributions to scholarship, research and the education of future generations of practitioners. Practice-defining pedagogy that emerged in the Beaux Arts and Bauhaus traditions has persisted for decades. This panel presents contemporaneous alternative Indigenous Practice and Pedagogies, where, from the words of Dr. Jojola, “planning is a culturally responsive and value-based approach to community development; where the measure of form is its cultural meaning rather than building elements as style, function and form; where the process of design is an orchestration of public engagement that gives voice and clarity to built form; where buildings are the narrative of a community and a metaphor for stories that are invested in place and time.”

Alternative Pedagogies: Indigenous & Pedagogies Discussion

Session Description

Conveners

Malini Srivastava, University of Minnesota
Theodore Jojola, Indigenous Design + Planning Institute & University of New Mexico
Tamarah Begay, Indigenous Design Studio + Architecture & University of New Mexico
David Fortin, David T. Fortin Architect Inc. & Laurentian University
Chris Cornelius, studio:indigenous & University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Rau Hoskins, TRIBE Architects & UNITEC Institute of Technology

In this panel we hear from five distinguished Indigenous architects who practice as designers, planners, and community organizers while making extensive contributions to scholarship, research and the education of future generations of practitioners. Practice-defining pedagogy that emerged in the Beaux Arts and Bauhaus traditions has persisted for decades. This panel presents contemporaneous alternative Indigenous Practice and Pedagogies, where, from the words of Dr. Jojola, “planning is a culturally responsive and value-based approach to community development; where the measure of form is its cultural meaning rather than building elements as style, function and form; where the process of design is an orchestration of public engagement that gives voice and clarity to built form; where buildings are the narrative of a community and a metaphor for stories that are invested in place and time.”

Opening Keynote: CARBON + PEOPLE

Session Description

A conversation between Catherine Flowers, whose new book titled Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret is scheduled to be released in November, and Lynne Dearborn, president of ACSA.

This conversation will orient people and communities at the center of the climate and carbon conversation and highlight the varied ways people are impacted by climate changes and rising greenhouse gases, from air quality issues, to water pollution and flooding, to political advocacy. Catherine Flowers will tell her personal story of her evolution of an activist, from country girl to student civil rights organizer to environmental justice champion.

2020 Tau Sigma Delta, Gold Medal Keynote

Session Description

Tatiana Bilbao was born and grew up in Mexico City. She has built in many other countries than Mexico and works with a global outlook, but Mexico’s cultural, social and political conditions form a natural part of her activities; although often implicit, social commitment is like a built-in reflex – a way of thinking.

The two spheres in Bilbao’s work are linked by simple geometry; a tool that can communicate architectural principles to uneducated construction workers in Mexico. It is geometry that the hand can draw, as opposed to parametric design – design which is created by and large with the aid of the algorithmic thinking of the drawing programs and which most architects work with today. In both process and presentation, Bilbao works with paper collages in an analogue approach to a profession that is otherwise dominated today by virtual renderings.

Closing Panel Discussion

Session Description

Merve Bedir is an architect based in Rotterdam and Hong Kong. She is the co-founder of design practice Land and Civilization Compositions, and Aformal Academy and experimental pedagogies program focusing on urbanism and beyond. Currently, she is an adjunct assistant professor in Hong Kong University, Faculty of Architecture. Her research engages in the human and nonhuman flows, its infrastructures and technologies in built environment. She received her BArch at Middle East Technical University (2003) and her PhD at Delft University of Technology (2017).

Merve is a founding member of The Kitchen, a transnational women collective based in Gaziantep/ Turkey, and Center for Spatial Justice in Istanbul/ Turkey. She curated uncommon river (Plovdiv, Bulgaria), Vocabulary of Hospitality (Istanbul), and co-curated Automated Landscapes (Shenzhen). Her work took part in Venice, Istanbul Design, Shenzhen, and Saõ Paulo Biennales, and Oslo Triennale. She wrote in AD Magazine, Harvard Design Magazine, Volume, and Funambulist among others. Merve has taught in Birmingham University, Hong Kong University, Columbia GSAPP, and Delft University of Technology, among others.

Jason De León is Professor of Anthropology and Chicana, Chicano, and Central American Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles and Executive Director of the Undocumented Migration Project (UMP) inc., a 501(c)(3). The UMP is a long-term anthropological study of clandestine migration between Latin America and the United States that uses a combination of ethnographic, visual, archaeological, and forensic approaches to understand this violent social process. He is the author of the award-winning book “The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail” (featuring photos by Michael Wells) and Head Curator of the forthcoming global exhibition Hostile Terrain 94 that will be installed in 150 locations between May and October of 2020. De León is President of the Board of Directors for The Colibrí Center for Human Rights and a 2017 MacArthur Fellow.

Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello draw, build, 3D print, teach, and write about architecture as a cultural endeavor deeply influenced by craft traditions and contemporary technologies. Wired magazine writes of their innovations, “while others busy themselves trying to prove that it’s possible to 3-D print a house, Rael and San Fratello are occupied with trying to design one people would actually want to live in”. They are founding partners of the Oakland based Make-Tank, Emerging Objects and they speculate about the social agency of architecture, particularly along the borderlands between the USA and Mexico, in their studio RAEL SAN FRATELLO. You can see their drawings, models, and objects in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Opening Keynote: Anupama Kundoo

Session Description

Anupama Kundoo’s opening keynote at the Engaging the World | 2018 ACSA Administrators Conference in Quebec, Canada.

Closing Keynote: Anna Heringer

Session Description

Anna Heringer Keynote @ 2018 ACSA Administrators Conference | Engaging the World.

Danielle Dent
Director of Membership, Marketing, and Publications
202-785-2324
ddent@acsa-arch.org