PETITE-RIVIÈRE-DE-NIPPES

Media Center


PETITE-RIVIÈRE-DE-NIPPES

Media Center


STUDENT  

Jeremy Copley



DESCRIPTION

 

The design of this media center proposal focuses on connecting the structure to the land and people of Haiti. This is achieved through selection of materials and design intent. Rammed earth construction is used to create structural walls and bamboo is used for the roof structure. The rammed earth walls literally root the project to the land. By growing and harvesting bamboo at the site, the project can be repaired and expanded upon using locally grown materials.

The bamboo roof structure is designed to collect rainwater at a central location where it can then be used throughout the facility. The large roof area also provides space for mounting solar panels to generate energy. Thick rammed earth walls provide thermal mass and will reduce the interior temperature of the buildings.




STUDENT  

Kevin Grewe



DESCRIPTION

 

This proposal locates the media center slightly west of the current town core. As the built-up area of town continues to expand, the media center will remain situated in a prominent location within the new development. Three important factors influenced the design of this facility: community, education, and growth. The project is set up as a campus of five buildings to be constructed in phases. This allows construction of the project to begin even if all the necessary funding has not been acquired. The buildings themselves are designed with sloped roofs to collect rainwater and to allow for natural ventilation. Building placement also provides opportunity for garden space throughout the campus as well as a central gathering area. The roofs provide ample space for solar panels. If covered with roof-mounted panels, this option can easily generate enough electricity to power the center and also surrounding buildings. The building will facilitate community interaction through spaces for social gatherings, energy generation, and garden maintenance, and will enable connections to places and resources outside Petite-Rivière-de-Nippes. Those who use the media center will acquire new knowledge via online learning, lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and activities, empowering the community of Petite-Rivière-de-Nippes through personal, social, and economic growth.

The project is designed using a Lamboo post-beam system and Stramit compressed agricultural fiberboard for sheathing. Both of these products will demonstrate to the community how sustainable building practices can be integrated through use of by-products of agricultural production.




PETITE-RIVIÈRE-DE-NIPPES

Media Center


STUDENT  

Holden Scully



DESCRIPTION

 

The site for this media center proposal was chosen based on its proximity to the farmers’ co-operative. However, it still provides a distinctive building site as well as unique building identity. The creation of the media lab within this center expands educational opportunity both programmatically and spatially. 

The spatial approach supports the idea of the growth of education and commerce for a small town like Petite-Rivière-de-Nippes by providing a flexible facility that can be further used as a tool to educate its users. The building is designed to meet net-zero energy requirements through design and technological elements.

The unique structure and form of this media center are developed from traditional Haitian housing forms. The building mass incorporates the gable, the flat, and the pitched roof types with interesting and individualistic use of the verandah.

This unique form is constructed from locally available timber, employing traditional craftsmanship to help revive and support these skills within the community.




PETITE-RIVIÈRE-DE-NIPPES

Media Center


STUDENT  

Lawrence Wyman



DESCRIPTION

 

Located on the same site as the Farmer’s Co-Operative, this media center proposal focuses on collaboration between the two facilities. The project is broken down into phases, and the construction methods promote community involvement. Earth bags are used to create structural walls for some areas of the building, and compressed agricultural fiber panels for other phases. Timber is used for the roof construction and Encap Cementitious Seal is applied to exterior walls. The process of earth bag construction engages the community in the project and teaches them a construction technique that can be used for future construction projects. Compressed fiberboard panels demonstrate potential uses for agricultural by-products.

The project makes use of natural ventilation and natural lighting. Outdoor areas are located along the coast and provide spectacular views of the ocean. Garden spaces can be shared with the farmer’s co-operative and are used to expose the community to new agricultural techniques.