Upper Squamish Research and Residence





TITLE

Upper Squamish Research and Residence



STUDENT

Jesse Bird
Carleton University



FACULTY SPONSORS  

Sheryl Boyle
Carleton University

 




JUROR COMMENTS   This winning project rose to the top for its excellent and in-depth attention to prefabrication, modular construction and building detail that approaches net-zero construction. The design addresses sustainability issues, climate, and flooding head on, and is sensitive, even poetic to issues of daylight. A multiple building layout makes it possible to limit how much space is heated, which is well suited to the cold climate on the Pacific west coast of Canada. The building sections are thoughtfully composed and the development of the design and clear graphics, including multiple versions of wall panels, are compelling and thorough.


DESCRIPTION   A majority of human settlement today sits in the valley of the British Columbia’s Squamish river delta, an area subject to annual freshet flood events fed by heavy rain, mountain runoff and glacier melt. While settlement in flood prone areas has decreased over the past 15 years, the Squamish district faces probable and consequential coastal flood hazards, just as major amounts of settlements lie elsewhere on the Pacific West coast of Canada.

The project explores this coastal housing situation through a new form and prototype design of prefabricated modular building system. Situated in the Upper Valley of the Squamish river system, lies a semi isolated dwelling designed to act as a research facility and prototype idea to  sustainable building systems for flood prone residential construction. Exploring a modification to structurally insulated panels (SIPs) it is shown displaying three varying forms of its implications. The barring heights of the three masses correspond to the relative flood level patterns that occur in the valley around every 70, 100, and 200 years respectivily. Oriented with optimal sun exposure and wind pattern dynamics, the masses act in a friendly conversation within the remote landscape, while integrated thresholds are created to lie between the building and its’ unique site conditions.  With integrated water collection and waste management systems, the home is also equipped with Photovoltaic silicon solar cells on the metal roof while in addition providing an industry standard of passive house design. Allowing the home to meet the average annual energy demands of the residences, ultimately resulting in a near net-zero home. With built in carpentry, shelving and spatial separations in the open plans, together, a diversity of spaces are created within the relatively simple volumes.