Within a Timber Glade




The Delancey Cut




TITLE

Within a Timber Glade


STUDENTS   Ross Silverman, Kelly Hayes, James Ko, and Caitlin Powell
Philadelphia University


FACULTY SPONSORS
Lisa Phillips, Li Hao, and Edgar Stach
Philadelphia University


JUROR COMMENTS  

This submission is memorable for its section along with other beautiful drawings. It is a very compelling scheme at the urban scale, with its grand gesture of filling up the block with a volume and then carving through it all the way down into the subway. The scheme uses the ground planes intelligently with the creation of retail at that level. The richness on the inner block is very special. The clarity of systems is great, and the use of timber is appropriate.

The submission unfortunately doesn’t show a convincing concept in plan as it does in section and there are doubts about the efficiencies of the housing. Does the planning actually work out? It’s hard to know at this level of development.



DESCRIPTION   The proposed timber design was inspired by studying likely pathways of transportation on this site in the lower east side of New York City with public spaces acting as a natural extension of this circulation. An erosion of the planes, both above and below the street level, create dynamic spaces, moving a user up, down and through the three story connected forum. This design feature allows for the integration of dynamic "off"€ grade planes to function as an extension of the ground level experience. The scheme holds the urban wall at the perimeter with a wood framed storefront glazing system to respond to the culture of the area. By contrast, the warm cedar louvered facades facing the interior create an inviting open public space within the site'€™s boundaries, allowing maximum natural lighting to penetrate the building in the winter and reduce solar gains in the summer.The Williamsburg Bridge traffic and high density of Delancy Street reinforce a flow of movement past the site that creates a smooth entrance and exit path.




TITLE

The Delancey Cut


STUDENTS   Zachary Jorgensen, Elizabeth Kelley, and Charles Landefeld
University of Washington


FACULTY SPONSORS
Richard Mohler and Elizabeth Golden
University of Washington


JUROR COMMENTS  

This project should be recognized for its parti. The “cut” is a delightful metaphor and strong concept. The urban strategy is also solid. The location of a market and the remapping the street as a pedestrian way is a smart idea. There is also a nice integration of environmental strategies with ideas about airflow and heating/cooling loads. The unit plans are well developed and they show a good amount of variation. However, without seeing drawings for timber details or interior renderings, the submission leaves us with a lot of questions and the representation of the project also doesn’t reflect the potential life of the building.



DESCRIPTION   A cut in a simple, wrapped city block, provides a welcome reprieve from the Lower East Side. The Delancey Cut is an architectural manifestation of kintsugi, as in the Japanese idea of making broken parts whole again; celebrating the history of the Lower East Side while creating an integrated future. The site mends New York'€™s fabric of tenement housing and towers in the park; a site, once a rend in the vibrant neighborhood fabric is re-imagined as a celebrated urban space. A neighborhood of diverse spaces and experiences exists within the block, awaiting discovery. At the street, the building holds the urban edge with continuous understated facade. Restaurants, bars, and retail, encourage activity along the busy exterior edges enriching the life of the neighborhood. The cut provides a passage between major transit points on Delancey and Essex. Shaped by sun angles, the faceted interior pulls daylight and fresh air into the inner spaces of the block. Markets occupy the lower two levels of this carved space, offering a bustling, intimate public experience surrounded by warm wood. Stairs ascend to an elevated boardwalk. On the upper deck market stalls allow pedestrians to observe the busy spectacle below from a slightly slower pace. THE WARHOL MUSEUM Obscured behind the same understated wrapper as the rest of the block, The Warhol Museum is cut off by the flow of people arriving from the Delancey Subway Station. The mirrored glass of the museum's faceted side reflects the life of the city around it. From the outside, New York is reflected in a disjointed and faceted collage, while the austere interior provides a space to consider the juxtaposition of Warhol'€™s work and the everyday. The experience culminates in a rooftop plaza where, after having ascended from cavernous below grade exhibits, visitors are again blinded by the vibrancy and bustle of NYC. THE HOUSING Semi-private courtyard spaces are also carved from within the mass of the block. Residential units pinwheel out on a 30'€™ bay. These courtyard spaces provide a serene juxtaposition to city life outside and follow the same faceted architectural language as the primary cut through the block.