KYGYZSTAN-CHINA BORDER CROSSING




INTERJECTION




TITLE

Kyrgyzstan-China Border Crossing



STUDENTS  

Donovan Dunkley, Vail Nuguid & Alexia Sanchez
City College of New York



FACULTY SPONSOR  

Martin Stigsgaard
City College of New York

 
JUROR COMMENTS

This winning design is impressive for achieving a multitude of goals. The formal expression of two curving pieces that seemingly interlock but do not actually touch is very graceful, and the project celebrates the local tradition of weaving very well with its perforated metal woven skin that wraps around the building’s structural steel skeleton. The simple, straightforward path for vehicles through the station is well planned, and the gateway aspects are well designed. Overall, the integration of the building’s systems is for the most part successful (the water collection feature has good intent, but would require more technical attention), and the station sits beautifully within its context, rising up and through the mountain pass.


 DESCRIPTION   Kyrgyzstan’s location on the planet lends itself to a rich history of tradition. The weaving techniques used by the native people date back to the times of the Silk Road and prove to be a strong and reliable manipulation of materials. These techniques can be seen in both the shelters of the nomadic people as well as the basket weaving of the Kyrgyz. The forms of the building masses in this project are derived as a response to the natural flow of traffic along the existing road and an attempt to create the most efficient progression through the building; with either country having it’s own facilities. The curving forms speak to the nature of a border crossing complex, with an overhang for scanning and direct passage. Although there is a physical separation, dependent on the country one is coming from, there is a strong visual connection that constantly exists between the buildings. Above the traffic lanes where both masses become cantilever is where the visual connection is most prevalent. This void allows for residents from either country to be able to see their destination as well as the interactions taking pace in the adjacent building. The spiraling of the skin allows for the façade to become the roof at certain points. As a response to the lighting needs of the interior spaces, the sloping of the walls allow for maximum collection of natural light. The metal perforated skin over the glazing allows for control over how much light is allowed into the spaces within, based on the size and spacing of the perforations. The extreme high and low points created by the twisting of the skin allows for water collection systems to be applied along the buildings façade. There are primary and secondary structural systems that allow for these adaptations. The primary system consists of steel frames that span the length of the building. The secondary system consists of diagonal steel members that act as a cross bracing and allow for the twisted façade of the building as well as the major cantilever portions of both buildings to be structurally balanced.




TITLE

Interjection



STUDENT  

Kyle Marren
Ryerson University 



FACULTY SPONSOR  

Kendra Schank Smith
Ryerson University 

 
JUROR COMMENTS

This winning design is elegant and most compelling for its single grand, central space. The long-span steel structure covered by a canopy creates an exciting open plaza underneath, and the patterned cladding of the canopy is beautifully designed. The sequence of spaces is clear and the circulation is well laid out. The symmetry of the two bars on either side of the border is an honest formal response to the building-type and works well in this location. Overall, the project presents the material well, and there is nice transparency about the way the secondary steel system works with the cladding of the two bars as well as a delicate quality that is expressed by the building’s space frame.


 DESCRIPTION  

Segregated from Spain hundreds of years ago; Gibraltar sits as a British overseas territory that has been the cause of turmoil in Europe since its conception. Located at the southernmost tip of Spain, Gibraltar is an advantageous port with access to the Mediterranean and the Atlantic Ocean. Regaining this territory has been an objective of the Spanish government for decades. In recent years Britain and Spain have come to an agreement that upon a majority vote from the people of Gibraltar that Spain and Britain could share the territory. This proposition was beaten out by a vast majority vote. The people of Gibraltar wish to remain under the British crown. In response to this Spain has launched a campaign of strict border regulation to punish the millions of people which cross the border every year. Due to these strict regulations and few customs officers, line-ups have developed that are often several hours long.

The development of interject aims to heal the bond that has been broken between Gibraltar and Spain. Through the consolidation of the border crossing station on the Spanish side of the border; Spain gains territorial ownership over the border crossing, while providing a gesture of good will as Gibraltar gains access space. Through interjects’ development spatial efficiency is gained allowing for larger public green spaces. As well as a developed connection is created between the nations via a connecting public space and an overarching canopy solution. This public space and versatile canopy allows for a variety of functions and bridges the gap between the two nations. Through the provision of a shared public realm discussion is generated. A point for the sharing of culture, ideas, and the human experience.