Category I Transit Hub

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION CENTER
Public transportation is undergoing rapid change due to evolving economic uncertainty and the insecurity of earth’s natural resources. Society is rediscovering public transportation’s usability, environmental kindness, and cost effectiveness. A majority of transit passengers are traveling within a local area or region between their homes and places of employment, shopping, or schools. A transportation center often serves as the city’s gateway for visitors and reflects the cities heritage, people, and values.

The competition program encourages students to merge two modes of public transportation while considering the facility’s potential symbolic aesthetics and connection to the city with its surrounding community. Students working alone or in teams are to design a Transit Hub to accommodate the needs of their city. This could be a ground-up design or a redesign of an existing facility. This transportation center will need to support two means of mass transit and should be designed to be able to expand in the future. Passengers will change or transfer between the modes of transit; convenience in getting around and through is important, since many travelers need to quickly and efficiently move from transportation and back. The center will also be a hub of interaction and a significant emblem of the nature and character of the culture it serves. The center may include convenience services such as a coffee shop, newspaper or magazine stand or other small retail.

SUSTAINABLE INITIATIVES
Sustainable design innovations and ideas should be used throughout the Transportation Center including the building and exterior. Sustainably designed buildings and sites aim to lessen their impact on our environment through energy and resource efficiency. Sustainable design concepts must include at least three of the following solutions provided by concrete technology: durability, recyclability, reduced site disturbance, storm water management, heat island mitigation, optimized energy performance, indoor air quality, material use reductions, and recycled content use. Information regarding these solutions can be found at www.ConcreteThinker.com. Solutions providing multiple benefits from a single application will receive extra credit. For example, insulated concrete wall systems have numerous benefits such as structure, fire resistance, noise abatement, superior energy performance through high R-value, negligible air infiltration, and thermal mass for solar heat storage, improved air quality (no paints required) and reduced maintenance. Site and landscaping can make use of permeable concrete paving systems to mitigate the negative effects of storm water runoff. Entries should clearly indicate which sustainable strategies are being employed and give indication of an understanding of the benefit of the same.

The jury will select winners in each category based on the extent students have developed inventive ways to integrate portland cement-based solutions into their design to achieve sustainable development objectives.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
 Design an environmentally responsible Public Transportation Center focusing on architectural innovations to preserve tomorrow’s resources. The functional and programmatic requirements for the Transit Hub spaces are outlined below. The area allocations are suggestions only and may be altered. Solutions should observe the total gross square footage, within a range of plus or minus ten percent.


LIGHT RAIL SERVICES 
Light Rail will approach the station on 2 tracks, which are served by one center platform elevated to approximately 48”, thus allowing passengers to enter and exit trains without steps. The platforms must be a minimum of 24’ wide and 600’ long.

Waiting & Queuing Areas (including Platforms) 15,000 sq ft
Information Center/Desk 150 sq ft
Light Rail Offices 2 00 sq ft
Light Rail Total 15,350 sq ft

BUS SERVICES 
Coaches will service the station at a maximum of 6 at one time. Following are assumed coach information: Width 96”, Length 40’, Wheel base 279” (23’ 3”), Turning radius 44’, Seating for 44 passengers with room for 22 standees, and has a wheelchair lift.

Waiting & Queuing Areas (including Platforms) 4 ,000 sq ft
Information Center/Desk 150 sq ft
Bus Offices 2 00 sq ft
Bus Total 4 ,150 sq ft

TRANSIT HUB SHARED SERVICES
The following additional facilities may be added or removed dependent on the cities needs.

Ticketing/Office Facilities:

Ticket Queuing Area 35 0 sq ft
Fare Collection 3 00 sq ft
Offices (2 at 150 sq ft each) 3 00 sq ft
Storage 100 sq ft
Equipment Room 100 sq ft
Ticketing Facilities Total 1,150 sq ft

Employee Facilities:

Employee’s Lockers & Toilets 1,400 sq ft
Employee Lounge 5 00 sq ft
Employee Total 1,900 sq ft

Concessions:

Fast-food/Snack Bar 1,000 sq ft
Vending Machines 2 00 sq ft
Newsstand 5 00 sq ft
Concessions Total 1,700 sq ft

Toilets:

Public Toilets (M/F 500 sq ft each) 1,000 sq ft

Total Net Square Feet 25 ,250 sq ft

Total Gross Square Feet 30,000 sq ft

(Including 20% allowance for Mechanical, Structural & Circulation)


SITE
The site for this competition is at the discretion of students and/or faculty sponsors. Requirements however are for the site to be located in an urban context. The site needs to be adjacent to a major avenue for ease of public use and access for vehicles entering and exiting the facility. Submissions will be required to explain graphically or otherwise the site selection and strategy.

CODE INFORMATION
Refer to the International Building Code and the local zoning ordinance for information on parking requirements, height restrictions, set backs, easements, flood, egress and fire containment.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE
The design project must use concrete or any portland cement based application as a key building material for the structure and sitework. A strategy should be considered that evaluates a method for reducing overall life cycle impacts (environmental, social, and economic) for the project in using innovative methods of structure, fabrication and construction. Sustainable design concepts must include at least three of the following solutions provided by concrete technology: durability, recyclability, reduced site disturbance, storm water management, heat island mitigation, optimized energy performance, indoor air quality, material use reductions, and recycled content use. Information regarding these solutions can be found at www.ConcreteThinker.com.

REQUIRED DRAWINGS
It is required that each presentation address, but not be limited to, the specific criteria outlined in the design challenge through the following required drawings:

  • site plan showing the surrounding buildings and streets, topography and circulation patterns;
  • floor plans;
  • elevations and building sections sufficient to show site context and major program elements
  • drawings that best show the relationship between portland cement-based materials and sustainable design objectives, such as floor plans, elevations and sections;
  • illustrations of key elements of sustainable infrastructure and building systems
  • detail drawing(s), either two or three-dimensional, illustrating the key elements of sustainable infrastructure and building systems;
  • a three-dimensional representation in the form of axonometric, perspective, or model photographs.

All drawings should be drawn at a scale appropriate to the design solution and include a graphic scale and north arrow as appropriate.

DOWNLOADS
Concrete Competition Program (PDF)